Tag Archives: Wyoming

A Roundup of Volunteer River Cleanups

IMG_1096(Photo by Robert Barossi)

by Robert Barossi

One of the most common ways for volunteers to get involved in their local environment is through river cleanups. Local rivers are often in dire need of help and dedicated volunteers are there to answer the call. They are often on and in their local river all year long and in all kinds of weather. And it’s the kind of volunteer story I like to highlight on here from time to time. Here are just a few recent ones:

A “Source to Sea” cleanup effort recently took place along the Connecticut River, in locations from its source near Canada all the way to the Long Island Sound.

The annual Rivers Alive cleanup recently took place along bodies of water in the Athens, Georgia area.

Volunteers have been working to clean the Bakulahi River in India.

With similar cleanups happening in Florida and Wyoming.

If you’ve enjoyed the stories on this blog, download my eBook – Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day. Available at the following links.

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Volunteers Working with Rangers

Through the Trees

by Robert Barossi

I found out this morning that today is World Ranger Day. Along with environmental volunteers, Park Rangers are on the front lines of conservation efforts around the world. Rangers do a wide variety of jobs, including many tasks which are directly related to environmental protection and preservation. They are often, if not always, the ones who train and lead the volunteers who work alongside them.

There are numerous examples of volunteers and rangers working together. Here are just a few of them that popped up this morning: In Wyoming, both volunteers and rangers work to keep people using the parks safe. In Tennessee, volunteers are working alongside rangers to remove invasive species. The same kind of work is happening in Great Britain. A volunteer in this story from North Carolina notes that the volunteers support and assist the rangers by doing “necessary work that the park rangers don’t have time to accomplish.” And on the Delaware River, rangers and volunteers worked side-by-side to clean up the river during a large annual cleanup event.

If you’ve enjoyed the stories on this blog, download my eBook – Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day. Available at the following links –

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Volunteer Moose Spotters

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(Image courtesy of puttsk at FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

by Robert Barossi

I confess, I love these kinds of stories. As someone who has always had a love for and appreciation of wildlife in all its forms, stories about volunteers working to protect wildlife definitely have a certain appeal to me. From the wales off the coast of Hawaii to birds navigating the Chicago skyline, other species are all around us, sharing every part of this planet with us. It may truthfully be said that it’s their planet and we’re just living on it. Today’s story focuses on moose, who are being monitored and counted by volunteer citizen scientists in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The “Moose Day” event is held every year and gives area organizations an annual opportunity to gauge how healthy the moose population is. Volunteers, specially trained by Nature Mapping Jackson Hole, spend the day going into areas where professional biologists don’t often go, which allows the volunteers to provide the professional scientists with much-needed data. Led by the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation, this important effort, and the equally important role played by volunteers, is a vital tool in keeping track of a majestic animal and an important part of the natural ecosystem.

If you have enjoyed any of the stories on this site, check out my eBook, Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day

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Hall of Fame Volunteers

IMG_0504(Photo by Robert Barossi)

by Robert Barossi

I’m a little ashamed to admit that I have never heard of the Outdoor Hall of Fame. I should say, I’ve never heard of any of them, since there are a number of them, in states including Wyoming, California and Arizona.

Today, I came across this story about the brand new Outdoor Hall of Fame in  Montana and it’s inaugural inductees. While the inductees include outdoor legends of the past like President Theodore Roosevelt, there are also some modern-day citizens who are doing inspiring work in their local area. For example, there is Gerry Jennings, who is described as a “longtime wilderness volunteer,” and “citizen advocate” Chris Marchion. These halls of fame are great ways to recognize the work of people who have had an indelible impact on their local wilderness, including passionate, dedicated volunteers.

 

Volunteering For the Summer

Rocks in Still Water(Photo by Robert Barossi)

by Robert Barossi

Here in New England, there are many areas where the population swells in the summer. On Cape Cod, the coast of Maine and down in southern Rhode Island, many people arrive in the late spring and stay just until the weather gets cold enough to motivate the return trip south. This great story out of National Elk Refuge in Wyoming introduces us to some people who don’t spend their summers at the beach house enjoying the warm weather, sand and surf. They choose to jump in their RV and head to a National Wildlife Refuge to spend the summer working as volunteers. At many refuges, there aren’t many paid, full-time staffers and these summer volunteers make a huge difference, performing essential tasks all season long. Monitoring wildlife, protecting habitat, leading tours and providing visitors with educational classes or demonstrations are just a few of the jobs filled by these summertime environmental heroes.

More information here on National Elk Refuge. While the story focuses on that refuge, many volunteers spend the summer at other refuges in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.