Tag Archives: Oregon

Environmental Volunteers Build Bridges

IMG_0865Photo by Robert Barossi

by Robert Barossi

That headline certainly has a literal and figurative meaning. On one hand, volunteers build bridges between environmental organizations and the surrounding communities. People often, if not always, get to know organizations through meeting and speaking with volunteers. One the other hand, volunteers are sometimes tasked with building literal bridges, like the one volunteers are considering along the Illinois River Trail in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area in Oregon. There are actually around one hundred bridges in need of repair in the area and the Siskiyou Mountain Club is leading the effort to give some attention and care to the worst of them. Check out the full article for more information on just how the group plans to achieve this impressive and important goal.

Check out many more environmental volunteer stories in my eBook, Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day

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Volunteers, Beavers and Goats

ID-100174934Image courtesy of ponsulak at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

by Robert Barossi

An environmental volunteer, a beaver and a goat walk into a bar…Ok, it’s not really the beginning of a joke. It’s actually the beginning of an environmental volunteer story out of Oregon featuring volunteers and goats working to help the local beaver population. When invasive species started taking over the beaver’s home, a local environmental organization brought in goats to deal with the problem. The group, Beaver Environmental Advocacy Volunteers (B.E.A.V.), rented 34 goats, who have been efficiently removing the unwanted plants. Once the goats’ work is done, the humans will continue to do whatever they can to help keep the beavers healthy and thriving. The young organization is a great example of how volunteers can  work together (and with other species, like goats) to figure out ways to coexist with wildlife, rather than trying to simply remove it.

If you have enjoyed any of the stories on this blog, download my eBook – Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day

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Volunteers Help Salmon with Christmas Trees

IMG_2853(Photo by Robert Barossi)

by Robert Barossi

At first, it may seem that Christmas trees and salmon don’t really go together. In this case, they do. Volunteers are part of an effort in Oregon to create spawning habitat for salmon by using parts of Christmas trees. As the trees were collected, tree parts and debris were used to slow the water down, creating  places where salmon can spawn. A collection of groups and organizations were involved in the effort, including the South Coast chapter of Coastal Conservation Association Oregon and a number of local students.

If you’ve enjoyed the stories on this blog, check out my eBook, Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day

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Many Volunteers Working Together

Up a Tree(Photo by Robert Barossi)

by Robert Barossi

As I’ve mentioned many times on this blog, collaboration and cooperation are essential elements to volunteering. People who volunteer don’t just work with the organization they volunteer with, they also often work with other volunteers from other organizations. This article from Clackamas, a suburb of Portland, Oregon, caught my eye because of just how many different organizations are involved. There are at least eight different organizations mentioned in the story, which covers a number of events happening around Portland to restore the area’s watershed during Earth Month (April). At each of the events, different organizations (two or more working together at each event) brought together large groups of volunteers who made a huge impact.

If you’ve enjoyed any of the stories on this blog, check out my eBook, Being Where You Are: How Environmental Volunteers Impact Their Community and the Planet Every Day

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iTunes

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BeingFinal